Welcome to Iron Acton Garden Centre

Welcome to Iron Acton Garden Centre, a family owned and run independent garden centre. Come and see us for a great selection of seasonal plants, gardening products, gifts and furniture, as well as trained and friendly staff who are always on hand to help. We hope to see you soon.

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Allotment Sue

Allotment Sue brings you regular updates on her journey to self-sufficiency.  Share her experiences as she tackles the ups and downs of growing her own fruit, veg, flowers and herbs as well as coping with the challenges of erratic weather, invasive weeds and peckish birds!

Read Latest Blog - Friday 3rd October

Read Introduction

Bee and butterfly gardening

A garden humming with bees and shimmering with brilliantly-coloured butterflies is full of life and beauty, the insects adding another dimension to your planting and giving you yet another reason to enjoy your garden.

By encouraging bees and butterflies into your garden you're doing theā€¦

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Warm up your seeds

Invest in a heated propagator and you'll find greenhouse crops are easy to get going at this time of year

Plant of the Week: Salix caprea pendula

Plant of the Week: Salix caprea pendula

The Kilmarnock willow is perhaps the best-loved of small garden trees, a graceful little thing no taller than a person with arching branches cascading in a waterfall of fresh green foliage all summer. Its best season, though, is early spring when the 'pussy willow' catkins erupt from bare branches like furry golden dormice, so soft you won't be able to resist stroking them as you pass.

In the open garden, give your Kilmarnock willow a damp, sunny spot to show it off at its best: they are so architectural they make very fine specimen trees for the centre of a lawn. They're also very happy in large containers, though make sure you keep it well watered as willows never like to dry out.

Keep the tree's lovely waterfall shape with a little light pruning in winter, taking out any shoots growing in the wrong direction and spoiling its shape, plus any which are showing signs of disease or which have died back. Every few years, shorten new growth by about a third to encourage the tree to produce lots of new shoots and keep its dense curtain of foliage looking good.