Welcome to Iron Acton Garden Centre

Welcome to Iron Acton Garden Centre, a family owned and run independent garden centre. Come and see us for a great selection of seasonal plants, gardening products, gifts and furniture, as well as trained and friendly staff who are always on hand to help. We hope to see you soon.

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Allotment Sue

Allotment Sue brings you regular updates on her journey to self-sufficiency.  Share her experiences as she tackles the ups and downs of growing her own fruit, veg, flowers and herbs as well as coping with the challenges of erratic weather, invasive weeds and peckish birds!

Read Latest Blog - Tuesday 17th March

Read Introduction

Growing for show

Growing your own food is one of life's great pleasures, and like most good things, it's worth doing well. A great way of measuring your progress is to pit yourself against the old-timers - producers of football-sized onions and metre-long carrots.

It takes courage to exhibit your produc…

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Plant of the Week: Bleeding Heart

Plant of the Week: Bleeding Heart

The romantic common name of this early summer beauty hasn’t changed, although its Latin name has: now called Lamprocapnos spectabilis, you may be more familiar with its previous name, Dicentra spectabilis.

The plant is just as lovely by any name, though, its delicate, arching stems appearing as if from nowhere in late May, dripping with exquisite pink (sometimes white) heart-shaped flowers, each dangling from gossamer-thin stalks. The dainty, ferny foliage is just as delightful, and dies down naturally after flowering: plant other pretty woodlanders like hostas or ferns alongside to fill the space. Dicentra is easy to grow in sun or part shade, and prefers well-drained but moist soil. 

Green plant food

As you finish your early harvests of broad beans and new potatoes, fill the gaps by broadcast-sowing summer green manures such as phacelia or buckwheat, available in large packets of seed from our garden centre. The lush green top growth is full of nitrogen: shear this off a few weeks before you want the bed again and add it to the compost, then fork the roots into the ground to rot down and feed your next crop.